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Peter Chochol

Sféra

Dr. Peter Chochol is an experienced expert focused on advanced information and communication technologies (ICT), especially in the energy and network industries. He graduated from the Technical University of Košice at Faculty of Electrical Engineering and Informatics (received degree Ing. equivalent to MSc.), where he also received a postgraduate degree (PhD). He was involved in the management structures of many projects aimed at restructuring, consolidating and improving business efficiency. Over the last 10 years, he has been devoted to smart grid technologies, intelligent cities and energy efficiency solutions. In recent years, he was Head of Operations and Development of the IT Division in the Slovak Gas Industry, later Head of Energy Data Management and Measurement at the West-Slovak Distribution Company. Since June 2018 he has been working in the field of innovation at SFERA, a.s.

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  • From smart metering systems to new energy services and sustainability (ESG)   |   Jesenná ITAPA 2023
    Historically, we have the highest concentration of greenhouse gases in the air, with energy, industry and transport being the biggest contributors. One of the measures to reduce consumption is the introduction of smart metering systems (IMS), which have been installed in our country since 2013, and there are now half a million electricity consumption points equipped with smart meters. The current state of use of IMS data is concentrated on the extraction of consumption data and its use to generate bills for the end-user, and the uptake of new energy services has been slow and embarrassing. Only part of the metered data is also shared with customers and other market participants, the rest of the data hides as yet untapped potential. There is a growing number of innovative projects and products in neighbouring countries dealing with advanced energy data analytics from IMS, which helps them to increase the prestige of scientific research institutions, but also the competitiveness of companies in the local as well as European market. Slovakia has a lot of catching up to do in this respect. The potential lies in proactive services to provide end-users with useful information on the basis of the analysis of these data regarding their consumption, their environmental impact (also usable in ESG repotre), the possibilities of integrating RES into their energy management, or information on anomalies (possible malfunctions) of equipment, or on the possibilities of using new products, e.g. credit metering in the case of customers at risk of energy poverty. We should also think about other energy media, such as heat, where there is also great potential in terms of the use of waste heat that could benefit us all.
  • Efficient Energy in Smart Cities   |   Medzinárodný kongres ITAPA 2018: Hacking the Future

    Demand for energy is continually growing, and the quality of air, that has a significant impact on the health of the population, is related to it. Slovakia has long-term problems with air quality, with the main cause of the current situation being emissions from household heating and transportation emissions. Negative impacts mainly affect places with highest population concentration. A priority issue in the concept of smart cities should be energy efficiency with a long-term ambition of zero emissions and energy self-sufficiency, which is closely linked to the construction of "green infrastructure", the implementation of measures to mitigate climate changes, the zero-waste circular economy, electromobility and reduction of external noise. The first step should be the analysis of all available data, assessment of their interrelations as well as predictions of future developments, which will provide the basis for creating an action plan containing measures for achieving the long-term goals in building of Smart Cities.

  • Discussion panel   |   Medzinárodný kongres ITAPA 2018: Hacking the Future
  • Smart City – Integrated Digital Services   |   Medzinárodný kongres ITAPA 2017: Technology & HumanITy
    Many cities today ground basis for implementation of sustainable and interconnected concepts of Smart City. Parking is one of the examples. It is often a problem and drivers looking for a parking spot can represent up to 30% of the city traffic. Detectors installed at parking spots are the smart solution; they can detect if the spot is free or occupied and we can navigate drivers to free parking spots via app. This improves and lowers the traffic intensity as well as carbon oxide emissions. These individual “smart” solutions without any doubt solve barriers in city infrastructure. They enhance transport, security, energy supplies and waste disposal.

    The biggest challenge of the future is to integrate the increasing number of smart solutions into a complex ecosystem of connected objects, places and people; this can be achieved only through superior platform of Smart City. Smart City Platform technology connects citizens with local municipality and supports direct involvement, interaction and collaboration. The platform proactively offers services, announcements, information; it integrates, harmonizes and analyses huge amount of data to forecast, mitigate and prevent various problems. These data are e.g. used for smart redirection of traffic and to decrease number of traffic accidents, they are also used for identification of criminal places and crime mitigation, connection of citizens in work or outside of the city. The Smart City Platform creates added value and offers vast economic advantages as the public services are improved.
     
  • Smart City – Integrated Digital Services   |   Medzinárodný kongres ITAPA 2017: Technology & HumanITy
    Many cities today ground basis for implementation of sustainable and interconnected concepts of Smart City. Parking is one of the examples. It is often a problem and drivers looking for a parking spot can represent up to 30% of the city traffic. Detectors installed at parking spots are the smart solution; they can detect if the spot is free or occupied and we can navigate drivers to free parking spots via app. This improves and lowers the traffic intensity as well as carbon oxide emissions. These individual “smart” solutions without any doubt solve barriers in city infrastructure. They enhance transport, security, energy supplies and waste disposal.

    The biggest challenge of the future is to integrate the increasing number of smart solutions into a complex ecosystem of connected objects, places and people; this can be achieved only through superior platform of Smart City. Smart City Platform technology connects citizens with local municipality and supports direct involvement, interaction and collaboration. The platform proactively offers services, announcements, information; it integrates, harmonizes and analyses huge amount of data to forecast, mitigate and prevent various problems. These data are e.g. used for smart redirection of traffic and to decrease number of traffic accidents, they are also used for identification of criminal places and crime mitigation, connection of citizens in work or outside of the city. The Smart City Platform creates added value and offers vast economic advantages as the public services are improved.
     
  • Global trends in smart cities   |   Jarná ITAPA 2017
    Cities must address the increased number of service coordination and planning challenges because of urban sprawl. Citizens need better healthcare, cities need to decrease costly administrative overheads, not to mention the inefficient transportation systems, increasing communication and connectivity demands and finally inefficiency of the current energy systems. As cities face these substantial and interrelated challenges, it becomes clear that the ‘business as usual’ model has become obsolete. The Smart City concept responds more immediately and effectively, allows to local government to anticipate and fix the problems and thus minimize the impact of future disruptions. To implement a smart city is a complex task, involving different aspects and several actors. In recent years, many cities all over the world have been started to design and implement their own smart strategy, involving a large set of different players. As a smart city is especially based on the use of innovative technologies in the urban areas, three main actors are involved in its implementation: local government, research institutions and technology vendors. Local government is steering the planning of the "Intelligent City" and general aspects for the benefit of the inhabitants; research institutions offer their competences in studying and experimenting innovative technologies and solutions; vendors produce and sell technological platforms and infrastructures for the smart city realization. A linking role is played by consulting companies - systems integrators, offering coordination of all players and interoperability in these complex projects.
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